Gynoecium

Meet The Morphoids: Gynoecium

Gynoecium Sleeping…

This is a photo of Gynoecium.  We believe it is sleeping.

Gynoecium: Nutrient Acquisition


Gynoecium seems to suck nutrients off of things to feed.  He does not generally harm other animals, but seems to enjoy cleaning them.  We think he feeds off of the organisms that live on other animals, and on the things in his environment.

Gynoecium’s Skin

This is a photo of Gynoecium’s skin.  You can see the new layers peaking through underneath of the older ones.

IMR in the Newspaper!

 

The IMR is in the newspaper!  This article is from a couple of days ago….

Meet our Name-That-Morphoid! Winner!


This is the photo Cayla, our Name that Morphoid! Winner sent me of herself with her prize!

Taxonomy Chart

 

Taxonomy ChartI’m sure many of you are familiar with this.  This is a chart showing the taxonomy of a human, a fruit fly, and two of the Morphoids, Pteropod and Gynoecium.  As you can see, though we’ve determined that Morphopodia is a phylum, everything else mostly speculation at this point in time.  Because there are things missing, we are not sure how the Morphoids completely relate to one another and the rest of the kingdom of Animalia.

News: IMR’s Gynoecium Specimen First Morphoid to be Given a Proper Name!

 

Gynoecium is the first Morphoid to be given a proper name.

DAVE JOHNSON Calgary News

The Institute of Morphoid Research is getting a little closer to their subjects of choice, the Morphoids.  The Institute, or IMR, as it is known, officially gave one of it’s Morphoids an individual name yesterday.

The Morphoid in question was formerly known by the name the IMR had given to it’s particular species, Gynoecium. The Institute held a contest earlier this week to find a name for the individual Gynoecium Morphoid that is in their possession.

The Morphoid will now be called “Tarth”, courtesy of the contest’s winner, Cayla M.

“The naming contest may have been initially a bit of a publicity stunt,” says the winner, “but I was quite pleased to see there was a decent prize in exchange for the IMR’s use of the name.  Cayla will recieve, not only a mention of her win, and new connection to the Morphoid, Gynoecium, on the IMR’s website, but also a signed picture of the Morphoid from the IMR.

It is unclear whether the photograph will be signed by the Institute’s main face, Jennifer Akkermans, the Founder and Chief Researcher.  Akkermans was not available for comment when we inquired.

Name That Morphoid! Contest Winner!

 

The winner of the Name That Morphoid! Contest is Cayla M!  ”Tarth” is the official proper name of our Gynoecium specimen!  Thanks, Cayla!

The prize for this contest is a listing on the IMR website, as the official name-giver of our Gynoecium specimen.  Click here to see the listing.

The second part of the prize is a signed photograph (photo will be posted after the winner receives it)!

Cayla, I have emailed you for your mailing address to receive your prize.  If by some reason, you didn’t get my email, please email me at jennifer.akkermans@gmail.com.

Thank you to all who submitted names!

Contest: Name That Morphoid! (Gynoecium)

Gynoecium

We, at the IMR have decided that is important for our relationships with the Morphoids to give them proper names.  So, we’re going to hold a series of contests!

So what’s this contest, you say?

Name our only specimen of this species of Morphoid, Gynoecium.  The name should be easy to pronounce, and just for this particular Morphoid.

How to Play:

Post the name you are suggesting for this Morphoid in the comments below.  We will choose a name from the suggestions you come up with!

What’s the prize?

The winner gets an official mention on the IMR website as the name-giver of this particular Morphoid, as well as a signed photograph!

Contest ends Friday, May 27, at midnight.

Gynoecium: Natural Habitat

 

Gynoecium seems to enjoy smaller compact spaces. Here he is in the cave where he lived before I picked him up to study him in greater detail.  Gynoecium is a very slow mover, and we think that small spaces offer him the protection that is vital to his survival.